Tagged: amazon

Bills

Schemes active/complete: 35
Money made: £48.77

As mentioned in the last post Rowena and I are currently embroiled in the task of moving our possessions from a mouldy one-bed flat to a hopefully less mouldy two-bed flat, along with all the joyous landlord referencing and disputes over deposit payments that come with this, which is why kooky money-making schemes have taken a back seat lately. However I have another stag do this weekend and the last time I embarked on one of those in early March I drank myself amnesiacal and this blog saw a following month of silence, so I thought I’d jot the latest minor developments down before that potentially happens again.

All the down payments and deposits and impossibly extortionate admin fees that switching from one rental property to another entails has been softened minutely by cashing in a couple of my schemes, most noticeably the £10 Amazon gift card that ShopandScan rewarded me with which actually sold on eBay for its full value:

I can offer no explanation as to why the chap who purchased this did not simply buy a £10 voucher directly from Amazon. Perhaps he’s slyly gambling that I misread the card’s value and he’s actually getting a £50 voucher, perhaps he’s a clod who gets confused easily, we’ll never know. What I can posit with conviction though is that Scheme #71: Scan your shopping has proved to be the most effective scheme so far, bringing £15 to the pile via the combination of ReceiptHog and ShopandScan and very little actual work from myself. Granted ShopandScan still pester me on a daily basis querying why I haven’t scanned any barcodes recently, even phoning me at work to ask with genuine disappointment in their voice, and granted I now have a deep-seated impulse to pick up every receipt I espy on the street which I have to fight and I don’t know how long that’s going to hang around for, but I’ll take these trifling irritations over answering a thousand questions on Weegy for the same sort of dollar (Scheme #31).

Surprisingly my commemorative Samuel Johnson 50p also sold on eBay for almost double its value:

Now these particular 50ps aren’t even that rare, I’ve definitely handled many before when making 50 pence purchases – a pack of Softmints, for instance, or 9 carrier bags with an extra bag to carry them all in. A quick glance on the Check Your Change website and we see Sam’s 50p has a scarcity level of 1 which translates as “A coin that is usually readily available at or very near to face value.” Not to detract from Sam’s Herculean task of writing the first dictionary from aardvark to zygote but over 17 and a half million of these coins were circulated, making it really as common as muck. I’ve basically just sold a normal 50p coin, for a quid.

Scheme #144: Sell some funny money is certainly worth consideration then. I personally find it a ballache to place items on eBay but if you’re one of these strange characters who actually enjoys listing tat and watching the bids notch up then I advise going for it – with some adequate photos and the odd flourish in the description you could sell the contents of your coin purse at twice the price!

The only other contribution to my riches, besides a 20p I found on the floor (Scheme #61), was a result of finally cashing in my Qmee account (Scheme #16: Get paid to Google). This toolbar extension has been perched on my Google bar sporadically flipping me loose change for seemingly arbitrary searches; for a while it rewarded me for searching for “Tesco”, then that abruptly stopped and instead it liked it when I typed in “Deliveroo”, and the odd search for Batman or bananas would occasionally elicit a payment too. 5p was the average handout each time, and after 4 months of being monitored and over 50 installments received I decided to call this scheme done:

I can’t not recommend Scheme #16, it’s entirely unobtrusive and a fully legitimate scheme, a genuine source of free money. However that amount of money is very, very small, and I am criminally impatient, so Qmee is being cast aside in favour of quicker solutions. Hopefully by the end of this month I will be settled in a new flat and motivated to reap some get-rich-quick scheme rewards, motivated namely by daunting deposit payments and an abyssal overdraft! What fun!

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eBaywatch

Schemes active/complete: 35
Money made: £35.55

Not a substantial amount of activity over the past fortnight to be honest, but I’ve got some time on my hands this evening plus this marks the first moment whereabouts each scheme either active or complete has bagged me over £1 on average, so a celebratory blog post is in order. Also I have some eBay listings I want to promote to anyone who might find themselves reading this in the next 5 days, making this an actual worthwhile post. Do you like Amazon products and/or coins commemorating the 18th Century dictionary writer and Tourette’s sufferer Samuel Johnson? Then you might be able to snag an eBay bargain today, my friend – read on!

Before that I must report my other eBay news which has come as a welcome surprise, namely that my £5 note with serial number AA01 647380 actually sold for £10.50!

I posted the note to the buyer, a girl from Essex, the next day, and added £5.50 to my total project accumulations with astounded glee (the additional 2p since last posting, for any militant blog followers or HMRC staff who may be interested, was a result of the consistently gainful Scheme #61: Look down when you walk). I had sold a note of money for double its face value! Simply because of a sprinkling of alliteration on the serial number! Quite incredible.

Consequently I can state that Scheme #144: Sell some funny money – WORKS. It is possible to still make a profit on one of the new plastic £5 notes if the serial code is a rare one, even if so-called experts dismiss the idea; Pam West, Surrey-based British note dealer and an expert on the worth of printed currency who has authored tomes on the subject, told me in an email it would only be worth face value, but here’s Matt Rose now, woeful investor and hopeless spendthrift, with hard evidence to pooh-pooh Pam’s ideologies. Granted I’ve abandoned hopes of selling my AK37 & AK22 £5 notes, but I’ve still stung an Essex lass over £10 for £5 so I’m marking that scheme down as a success. Take a hike, Pam!

Optimistic that maybe I’ve actually stumbled across some entrepreneurial ambrosia here and can just start selling money for more money than that money, I have also listed a quasi-rare 50p that the vending machine shat out to me the other day:

Rather than the normal ‘tails’ on the 50p’s reverse side there’s a brief commemorative spiel for Sam Johnson, the impressive chap who wrote the first dictionary, single-handed, in the 1700s. It’s a far cry from today’s comprehensive Oxford English (he defined ‘oats’ as “a grain which in England is generally given to horses, but in Scotland supports the people”) but credit for getting his head down and churning out the basics for future dictionaries to improve upon. As a reward for his 9 years of unenviable toil, Samuel now has his name etched impossibly small upon the odd 50 pence piece here and there, and I want to cash in on this oat-definers legacy.

My 50p is listed here, currently on 99p and 0 bids but still with 5 days to run. It was Geoff at work, the kindly soul who provided me with so many receipts for Scheme #71: Scan your shopping, who advised me to list this 50p, so if nothing comes from it I will be blaming him loudly and publicly. Geoff did tell me of a chap he read about who collected and eBayed thousands of rare 50ps over a period of years at a few pence profit each, reassurance it’s not just me obsessing over online, labour-intensive schemes for minimal cash-flow.

The other item I have on eBay currently is a sort of currency in itself:

This £10’s worth of sweet Amazon consumerism was kindly sent by ShopandScan for submitting my first batch of barcodes using its little scanner gizmo. Whilst obviously I would have liked to have actually used this gift card as it was intended for and bought myself Battlefield 1 on the PS4 which I still haven’t played, I can only accept money-making-scheme revenue as cold, hard cash which is why I’m having to sell the £10 voucher for what will clearly be less than £10. That said after only a couple hours I already have a £7 bid so perhaps it’ll bizarrely shift for £25 and I’ll have another spite stick to waggle in Pam West’s frugal face.

Probably the first thing I can genuinely encourage you to partake in thus far in the blog is the ShopandScan campaign. It’s a staggeringly simple way to get your hands on £10 of Amazon jargon without fear of hospital trips or tabloid scandals – you sign up here, await your scanner in the post, rub it alongside literally any barcode on anything once, and just like that there’s a tenner in the post to you. Knowing my luck there’s some heinous unwritten complication which will make itself known in the next few weeks like I’m contractually obliged to submit 10 barcodes a day for life or the scanner gives you cancer or something, so feel free to hold off until then, but for now I can’t see any faults with this one. It’s surely a better method of achieving Scheme #71 than ReceiptHog seeing as it generated twice as much money with about 1/200th of the effort.

Not much else to report: the trigger word for confusing Qmee into rewarding me money (Scheme #16: Get paid to Google) has shifted from “Tesco” to “Deliveroo” so I’m no longer submitting daily searches for Tesco fancy dress costumes but rather local Wagamama branches, and my application to become an Amazon Mechanical Turk (Scheme #60), which I didn’t even know could get rejected, got rejected. “We regret to inform you that you will not be permitted to work on Mechanical Turk… and we cannot disclose the reason why an invitation to complete registration has been denied” was the totally helpful and unambiguous email Amazon treated me to. Thankfully there appears to be a good number of clone services also paying out which will hopefully either accept me or at least provide me a decent reason as to why not.

I know April’s blog posts are turning out to be practically as action-packed as March’s during which I didn’t post a thing, mainly as Rowena and I are trying to find a new place to live at the moment and it’s transpiring to be all sorts of shades of difficult, but do not see this as a lack of commitment to the cause! I’m nowhere near done with this 234-strong list of schemes yet. Don’t you worry – I’ll be linking you to tat I’m trying to shift on eBay for many months to come!